Studio

So many people have been interested in the creating of the studio in my garden, I thought I’d give it its own page for easy future reference!

Here’s the story in pictures:

When I look at this picture now, I wonder how on earth I could see beyond what was in front of me!!

this was my starting point
this was my starting point
When we bought the house, what is now the studio was once this overgrown dilapidated lean-to, which you’d struggle to descibe as a garage.  It was built from an eclectic mix of concrete, wood, asbestos and tin.  The floor was a mixture of old wooden pallets, sand and paving flags.  The ivy wound its way everywhere, inside and out.  Inside was dark (too dark for piccies unfortunately), damp and, quite frankly, a bit scary.
the old garage was demolished

the old garage was demolished

Below is the same thing from another angle.  That’s my front door in the background (which is really a side door), showing my commute to work!

another view
another view

 

The side door and window of the main brick-built garage, which opened into the old lean-to, was a bit old and rotten.  I figured that, as they would become internal fixtures, they would rot no more if I treated them.  This is a close-up of the windowframe:

yukky windowframe
yukky windowframe
The wider view:
the side door of garage
the side door of garage
The concrete floor was put in:
concrete floor

concrete floor

The local cats (and even the birds!) made their mark on the newly-laid concrete:
paw prints in the concrete

paw prints in the concrete

There was some dodgy-looking wiring to sort out:
all plugged in and ready to fry

all plugged in and ready to fry

We got some walls:
walls going up

walls going up

And then a window – salvaged by the builders from another site they were working on:
nearly there

nearly there

and then:
roofless studio

roofless studio

and:
studio is getting a roof

studio is getting a roof

Finally the roof was on:
the garden studio

the garden studio

I persuaded my teenage daughter to help out:
teen on a hot tin roof

teen on a hot tin roof

Well, it’s a bit more cool felt roof than hot tin but that doesn’t have the same ring to it. This is what she’s up to:
painting the fascia

painting the fascia

It got plastered inside:
plastered walls

plastered walls

Here it is from the outside, with walls, windows, guttering, fascia, a roof and even french doors!! (They came from the same place as the windows – another job the builders were on, so I very virtuously saved them from landfill.  The most eco-friendly uPVC windows  you ever did see!)
the studio is now built

the studio is now built

The garden is looking like it needs a bit of attention, and it does.  Things are happening slowly in the garden – it was very, very overgrown.
A path will be laid to the studio doors (recycled flags from the path I discovered in the overgrown lawn), and am deciding what to grow against the wall.  It’s a very sheltered south-facing wall – I have a grapevine in a pot which might like to climb up a sheltered south-facing wall.  It’s either that or a baby cherry tree (just a twig, really…) which might like to be fan-trained against it.
***
The Interior

 

The inside of the studio is now shaping up.  I decided to have my main painting desk overlooking the garden.  I know sometimes it’ll be too sunny, so I have another desk I can retreat to.  But I wanted to be able to look out over the garden while I work – and it’s my space, so why not?
inside the studio

inside the studio

and a bit more of the same:
my messy desk

my messy desk

and closer to my desk, looking through the window.  The desk is actually an old door, reclaimed from the house when it was a building site.  Propped onto two frames, it makes a fantastic, big worktable.
studio desk overlooking garden

studio desk overlooking garden

Behind the desk (below), there are shelves, which I use to dry items in between coats of paint.  The window over the shelves looks into the garage, where I pack orders for delivery.  This is the same window that had the yukky frame, earlier on this page.  It’s amazing what a bit of woodrot-hardener, filler and paint can do, isn’t it?

studio interior

studio interior

Yes, I do know how lucky I am!  I pinch myself daily!

1 Comment

  1. I have serious studio envy over this! Wow – you lucky duck!

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